ALUNAH

ALUNAH is a British doom metal band. That should be enough to wet your appetite. I know it is for me. So read this interview and then keep checking them out. Anders Ekdahl ©2017

You got a new album to promote. What can you tell us about this recording?
-We spent a long time writing Solennial, and were conscious that we needed it to sound different than our other three albums. We had guests for the first time, Charlotte Nicholls from Portishead and Crippled Black Phoenix on cello, and Rich Harris from Oily Toys on backing vocals. We recorded it with Chris Fielding at Skyhammer Studio, and had it mastered by Greg Chandler at Priory Studio. All of our other albums were recorded by Greg, and although we love his sound, we wanted a slightly different feel. We also recorded our first cover, “A Forest” by The Cure,

What kind of reaction have you had to your previous album? Did it do what you wanted it to do for the band? What will this new do for the band?
-Everyone has been very complimentary about the album, I think it took some people by surprise, but in a good way. It is too soon to tell what it will do for us, but first and foremost we’re very happy with it.

Today we have all these different sub-genres in metal. How important is that you can be tagged in one of these? Why isn’t metal enough as a tag?
-People want more from their music I think, there are millions of metal bands, and it just makes it more interesting to have all those cross overs. We’re not bothered about tags at all, some people call us a doom band, some call us a stoner band. If it means people check us out based on that, then cool, but we certainly don’t care what we’re tagged with, other than “female fronted”, we hate that tag.

We all carry baggage with us that affects us in one way or another but what would you say have been the single greatest influence on your sound?
-I would say the music we all listen to influences us far more than we’re aware of, and for me personally, the natural world and old religions are a huge influence on my lyrics.

Today I get a feeling that the promotion of a band lands a lot on the bands themselves so how does one promote oneself the best possible way in order to reach as many as possible?
-The best form of promotion is to get yourself out there, and play as many gigs as possible. When we started we would play any and every gig offered to us, and it really helped to build a following. We would play for free, in tiny back rooms and with any genre of band, just to get our music heard.

What is the live scene like for you? Do you feel that playing live helps building a bigger following?
-Birmingham’s isn’t great at the moment for our kind of music, and I know it has put off some bands visiting here, but there are some really good things happening in Manchester and Nottingham, which isn’t a million miles away from us. Yes, playing live is essential in building up a bigger following.

Do you as a band notice that it gets harder and harder to find place today that do live music? Is this reality a result of how people have changed the way they listen to music, home alone in front of a computer or on their phones/pads?
-It depends where we’re playing and in what country. When we started in 2006 there weren’t many small bands doing what we do, so it was really easy to get gigs. I’m no expert as to whether or why this has changed, but I know that in a small country like England there is now such a huge amount of bands and gigs happening all the time, that maybe people need a rest from it occasionally; mentally, physically and financially. I don’t know. An increase in ticket prices will have an effect on crowd numbers too.

I hear about how bands don’t bother with art work anymore because people don’t buy records anymore. That to me is just a lazy way of saying we’ve given up. Even if I buy something digitally I want to have nice art work otherwise I feel cheated and that the band aren’t serious. How do you feel about this new trend of no art work because people download instead of buying physical?
-If this is a new trend, then I’m not aware of it, and I don’t agree with it at all. I’m a Graphic Designer, so artwork will always have an important place in music for me. When I was a kid I used to buy CDs and tapes based on the cover, and still today, I’m disappointed when a band I like have awful artwork. I think in the last 10 years or so, especially with the genres we operate within, there has been a shift towards making artwork important again. We have always spent time coming up with concepts, and up until our third album, I always designed our artwork. When we started to have budgets for artwork, we outsourced it, it was great to have fresh eyes and new ideas.

We live in a world where everybody seems so easily offended by the smallest thing. Do you as a band feel that you have a responsibility to protect the free word and the right to express yourself the way you want?
-I don’t feel like we have a responsibility no, we’re not a political band and I’m not in a band to spread a particular message. I believe that everyone should be free to express themselves in a positive way. If what you wish to do will knowingly harm someone; physically or mentally, then obviously that is a whole different matter, and something I am strongly against.

What lies in the future
-We have some UK and EU dates planned which we are waiting on confirmations for, other than that we’ll just be rehearsing lots and planning our next step.

ALUNAH is a British doom metal band. That should be enough to wet your appetite. I know it is for me. So read this interview and then keep checking them out. Anders Ekdahl ©2017

You got a new album to promote. What can you tell us about this recording?
-We spent a long time writing Solennial, and were conscious that we needed it to sound different than our other three albums. We had guests for the first time, Charlotte Nicholls from Portishead and Crippled Black Phoenix on cello, and Rich Harris from Oily Toys on backing vocals. We recorded it with Chris Fielding at Skyhammer Studio, and had it mastered by Greg Chandler at Priory Studio. All of our other albums were recorded by Greg, and although we love his sound, we wanted a slightly different feel. We also recorded our first cover, “A Forest” by The Cure,

What kind of reaction have you had to your previous album? Did it do what you wanted it to do for the band? What will this new do for the band?
-Everyone has been very complimentary about the album, I think it took some people by surprise, but in a good way. It is too soon to tell what it will do for us, but first and foremost we’re very happy with it.

Today we have all these different sub-genres in metal. How important is that you can be tagged in one of these? Why isn’t metal enough as a tag?
-People want more from their music I think, there are millions of metal bands, and it just makes it more interesting to have all those cross overs. We’re not bothered about tags at all, some people call us a doom band, some call us a stoner band. If it means people check us out based on that, then cool, but we certainly don’t care what we’re tagged with, other than “female fronted”, we hate that tag.

We all carry baggage with us that affects us in one way or another but what would you say have been the single greatest influence on your sound?
-I would say the music we all listen to influences us far more than we’re aware of, and for me personally, the natural world and old religions are a huge influence on my lyrics.

Today I get a feeling that the promotion of a band lands a lot on the bands themselves so how does one promote oneself the best possible way in order to reach as many as possible?
-The best form of promotion is to get yourself out there, and play as many gigs as possible. When we started we would play any and every gig offered to us, and it really helped to build a following. We would play for free, in tiny back rooms and with any genre of band, just to get our music heard.

What is the live scene like for you? Do you feel that playing live helps building a bigger following?
-Birmingham’s isn’t great at the moment for our kind of music, and I know it has put off some bands visiting here, but there are some really good things happening in Manchester and Nottingham, which isn’t a million miles away from us. Yes, playing live is essential in building up a bigger following.

Do you as a band notice that it gets harder and harder to find place today that do live music? Is this reality a result of how people have changed the way they listen to music, home alone in front of a computer or on their phones/pads?
-It depends where we’re playing and in what country. When we started in 2006 there weren’t many small bands doing what we do, so it was really easy to get gigs. I’m no expert as to whether or why this has changed, but I know that in a small country like England there is now such a huge amount of bands and gigs happening all the time, that maybe people need a rest from it occasionally; mentally, physically and financially. I don’t know. An increase in ticket prices will have an effect on crowd numbers too.

I hear about how bands don’t bother with art work anymore because people don’t buy records anymore. That to me is just a lazy way of saying we’ve given up. Even if I buy something digitally I want to have nice art work otherwise I feel cheated and that the band aren’t serious. How do you feel about this new trend of no art work because people download instead of buying physical?
-If this is a new trend, then I’m not aware of it, and I don’t agree with it at all. I’m a Graphic Designer, so artwork will always have an important place in music for me. When I was a kid I used to buy CDs and tapes based on the cover, and still today, I’m disappointed when a band I like have awful artwork. I think in the last 10 years or so, especially with the genres we operate within, there has been a shift towards making artwork important again. We have always spent time coming up with concepts, and up until our third album, I always designed our artwork. When we started to have budgets for artwork, we outsourced it, it was great to have fresh eyes and new ideas.

We live in a world where everybody seems so easily offended by the smallest thing. Do you as a band feel that you have a responsibility to protect the free word and the right to express yourself the way you want?
-I don’t feel like we have a responsibility no, we’re not a political band and I’m not in a band to spread a particular message. I believe that everyone should be free to express themselves in a positive way. If what you wish to do will knowingly harm someone; physically or mentally, then obviously that is a whole different matter, and something I am strongly against.

What lies in the future
-We have some UK and EU dates planned which we are waiting on confirmations for, other than that we’ll just be rehearsing lots and planning our next step.

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