CHAINBREAKER

In a world were there are so many bands to keep track of I want to bring my two cents in presenting you to this interview with CHAINBREAKER. Anders Ekdahl ©2019

You have one of these names that do not really tell what kind of metal you play. How hard was it to come up with the name?
-It’s just one of those names where you have a show coming up and need to call yourselves something, and CHAINBREAKER is what we used. Maybe if we added a 666 to the end it would be more clear what kind of music we play!

How do you introduce the band to people that are new to your music?
-Well that generally happens at shows where people have never heard of us. Rob frightens them and the rest of us just pummel their faces in the best we can.

We all carry baggage with us that affects us in one way or another but what would you say have been the single greatest influence on your sound?
-It comes in three parts: Old Milwaukee, weed and Driller Killer.

What is the scene like in your area? Is it important that there is some sort of local scene for a band to develop or can a band still exist in a vacuum of no scene/no bands?
-I guess Manilla Road playing shows in cornfields is proof you don’t need a scene, but it definitely helps us to have other bands to play with. I guess we’re lucky that we usually get the chance to play shows with decent lineups and good turnouts. It also helps being close to other major cities.

Something I have often wondered about is if you feel that you are part of something bigger and greater when you play in a band, that you are part of a movement sort of?
-Maybe we felt like that in our younger years when we first started playing in bands, but these days we don’t care about any of that. We only do this because we like writing songs and hearing them being played at maximum volume. If we only had work and no creative outlet, we’d probably all end up as serial killers.

When you play the sort of music you play I guess you cannot have birds and bees on the cover of your album? What is a great album cover to you?
-What about Budgie covers huh? I like covers you don’t have to squint at to figure out what’s going on. Simple art that stands out when flipping through records is good. Anything with squids or nautical art is shit.

What is your opinion on digital verses physical? Is digital killing music?
-Home taping is killing music! This is a very 2003 conversation. It would be hard to consider myself a fan of music if my entire collection only existed of Spotify downloads. Real fans will always buy the physical release (and then flip it on Discogs). Making a living off music is ancient history, therefore people can do whatever they want, it doesn’t matter to me.

What kind live scene is there for bands like yours?
-There’s always somewhere for us to play. We’re all reasonable. We don’t share our political beliefs, use pig’s blood or faygo, or shit on stage so we have plenty of options.

When you play live is it a happening or do you see it more as a party?
-You mean do we consider our shows “rituals”? It’s just an excuse to sell some merch, get some free drinks and hopefully pay our rehearsal space rent.

What would you like to see the future bring?
-We’d like for people to listen to our new album, and maybe play some shows in Europe. That would be ace!

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