THE FORESHADOWING

The name THE FORESHADOWING seems somehow very familiar yet I cannot remember ever having heard or done anything by them. But with a new album out there is no time like now to get down and dirty with the band. Answers by Francesco Sosto – keyboards & backing vocals. Anders Ekdahl ©2016

What is it that fascinates you into coming up with new songs and albums?
-I would say we wrote songs that steadily renewed our sound and sometimes we‘ve gone far beyond metal. Listening to the album intro, or several recurring passages I think most of listeners will remain displaced. On one hand it may also pose a risk, especially when it comes to a standard listener, but it’s a risk we want to take and that’s what it makes all exciting. Actually, I think The Foreshadowing is going to be destined not only to a metal audience, but also to a more sophisticated or simply “open-minded” listener. Just because we don’t use growl or scream but only clean vocals, I think our music has the potential to be appreciated by an audience outside of the metal scene.

How is this new recording different from the previous? How do you take your sound one step further?
-There are many different things in fact: in the first place, the production. For instance, I believe we made steps forward in order to achieve a powerful wall of sound for the guitars. As for the songwriting we experienced a lot on the choice of instruments, sounds and atmospheres, as I said before, even at a structural level we tried to make something new by creating a pseudo-suite as Nimrod. On the whole, we had our hands full. Of course, we spent a lot of time to make this album come true, but I’d say it was worth it.

When you write songs about the topics you do what kind of reactions do you get?
-I don’t think it’s a matter of reactions, but simply the fact you write a lyric in an honest and sincere way, describing what you feel or what it shows yourself. Regardless of the issues, and besides the fact we use many metaphors and symbolism in the lyrics, basically our songs talk about and what is around us, especially from an existential point of view. Sometimes you may think our songs are of political and social nature This is unevitable for the simple fact that politics and society affect our personalities and our mood. But it’s always our existential side to be the focus of our attention.

Whenever I think of you I cannot help wandering off to different bands. What bands do you indentify with?
-As a band we definitely identify in ourselves, we are our main point of reference for a while now. Speaking of inspiration for this album I would mention especially artists as Dead Can Dance, Bathory, The Swans, Explosions in the Sky, Gheorghe Zamfir, Pink Floyd, Neurosis, Popol Vuh etc.

How did you go about choosing artwork for this new album? What was important to have in it?
-We contacted several artists and Seth was the most interested one in helping us. This time, I think it was the right choice absolutely, because we were a bit ‘out of ideas about choosing the cover and some of them was somewhat trivial and obvious. Since we knew Seth, because he worked for us in the past, we were aware he would have created a basic idea for the artwork. So we let him do what he simply does best and suggested him only some elements we wanted to be present in the artwork.

What kind of topics does each song deal with? Is there a red thread to the songs?
-Actually there is a red thread running through the album and is the decadence of Europe, or rather the European Union, a major project that seems to crumble before our eyes just like the Tower of Babel. There is always such an apocalyptic symbolism in our songs, as it always was. In this case there are issues that at first sight may seem different from one another, but indeed they are all related to the main theme of the album.

How do you come up with song titles? What do they have to have to fit the songs?
-We just chose song titles that fit the album concept and song themes. Usually we choose a song title in a way that may arouse the listener’s curiosity, as we always tried to do since our debut.

Is digital a format that fits your music? Is digital killing music?
-Cyclone Empire, our label, will make our album available on i-Tunes. Speaking of digital music, I wouldn’t get to say we are against the digital music because there’s good and bad in it, like in all things. But so far it has been to the detriment of emerging bands, this certainly not because of the phenomenon in itself, but of his abuse globally speaking. Today we can listen to an album very easily, it takes just a 5-10 seconds search and you can find and make use of it without any problem. This is a great advantage, while in the 90’s it was even unthinkable, we all remember all of our countdowns for the release of your favorite band new album, which meant longer waiting times and, above all, spending money. But it’s also true this attitude had a unique romantic charm that nowadays evokes a kind of nostalgia on those who lived the old times. As to money, well, maybe CDs were a little bit expensive, but you certainly had the opportunity not to see bands dying after the second or third album as it’s happening now. Unfortunately, with the advent of the internet and the digital music we found ourselves faced with a phenomenon equal to the wheel invention that has knocked an entire system down and revolutionized our lives in all aspects. Therefore it is clear we are not yet accustomed to this change, so much that with regard to the music business we adopt the same old-fashioned system. Unfortunately we still haven’t found a way to adapt an entire system to this amazing invention and I think the only way is waiting for the listeners to evolve their cultural thought patterns. At a time when a listener realizes and accepts the idea a band cannot live just download the album, but it’s also necessary to support it, then something will bring to a change and there will be some more expectations for future bands. It just takes to make the new technological reality with the bands needs coexist together and I hope that sooner or later people will be aware of it.

How much of a live band are you? How important is playing live?
-We are a band whose aim is the same of many other bands, i.e., recording albums and playing live as much as possibile, as it should be. Considering what I said to the previous issue, playing live has become even more essential for the band survival. We were very pleased of having toured in Europe and in America, but it is equally true we wanted to make it more often and it hadn’t been possible. When I spoke of the fact today’s music industry is based on an old system I meant that if once the idea of investing on a tour had its convenience because not only it would have ensured a recovery of the costs to be advanced but also a lot of revenue, but nowadays we simply come back home after a tour with empty pockets. The bands, however, continue to adopt this old system because it’s the only way that will let you play as much as possible. And of course, just for the pleasure of playing, no one wants to give up the idea of playing live, even at the cost of losing much money. However, this game cannot last in the long run so it becomes quite normal (and I find it quite sad) that the bands prefer to disband sooner than expected.

What lies in the future?
-Two Horizons. But it’s too early to say which one is the best for us, I think we’ll discover it soon.

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