BLACK PALACE

BLACK PALACE might come from a sunny place but their music is as black as the night. Black Metal is the name of the game for this band. Anders Ekdahl ©2012

Can you please introduce us to Black Palace?
-Aphrodite –Voice, Lascivia – Guitar, Vritra – Bass & Chorus &Andraz – Drumms

How hard was it to go from an idea to form a band to actually realizing the band? Any trouble finding like-minded people to play with?
-To begin with the idea was not difficult, the truly hard was to find the correct persons who really want to play with us and to have this commitment that not a lot of people have, other problem was that METAL is a genre where there is not so much people, if it is difficult to find people with common ideologies, that play an instrument and in this case that person have to be a woman that is very difficult. To get a band in a country where the chauvinism stills present is so fucking difficult, sincerely our band positions was difficult but thanks to these obstacles we can achieve solid objectives. Obviously is not easy we have different likes but always we talk about them and then we can have a common conclusion and to had that way to resolve and arrives to a common conclusions is the way that allow us to capture the essence of each of us and you could listen to that essence in “THE ORIGIN OF CHAOS” our album debut.

When you play black metal in a country as catholic as yours do you attract any kind of controversy or criticism from the church?
-We don’t have problems from the church, any priest or any nun never tell us something about the band, but when someone have a topic with other person and this person don’t know anything about the band and this person don’t listen to BLACK METAL probably this person will gonna say that you are complete crazy hahaha, but in fact most of the critics are from our families because we don’t play a popular genre like pop or that kind of genres, that is why not a lot of people turn to take attention in us we are not a threat for catholic religion yet hahahaha, but we think the church has situation more important to have attention.

What kind of reaction do you get from the mainstream culture to you being a metal band?
-We think that is not necessary to be a catholic person or not to play Metal, but people have to be consistent in what are you showing with your music. We are not persons who enter in this common current but Black Metal fills our hearings the passion, hatred, pain, aggression and everything is handled are pleasing for us and have the opportunity to express ourselves with this kind of music is something that we appreciated a lot and for other hand of who “share” the same ideology or the same taste for the music as us not always have good reactions, there are people who don’t accept four girls playing Black Metal and those girls want to get part of the Black Metal Scene just because that people that don’t accept this situation don’t believe that we can to compose and to play a something really good, or simply they don’t believe that we can feel what we are playing like them, reactions are quite heterogeneous, on the other hand there are those who support us and they are always on the lookout for our work.

What kind of following do you have nationally? Do the fans support you or are they more into the international bands?
-At least Metal in Mexico could divided in two parts: 1. People who just follow foreign bands (they are the most) and 2. People that follow foreign and national bands. We have good support from the people that knows the national Metal scene, although exist a lot of people who just listen to foreign band without know that exist good nationals bands.

What has bands like Sarcofago, Volcano, Dorsal Atlantico, Sextrash etc. meant for today’s metal scene? Do people treat their national bands with any sort of pride and respect?
-Some of them, specially the old bans as Cenotaph, Toxodeth, Argentum, Shub Nigurath, Disgorge etc. because of they are old bands, and actually most of the people of this generation is so close minded to the new bands. In fact some of those bands are as a cult band in metal scene and actually here are not so much people that support and respect the work that you do as a band, sometimes the bands has more support out of their country, and that is why most of the bands want to go to other country because of that those bands could win the knowledge they want as a band and also they can has more support in other countries than in their country.

If you are called Sepultura I guess there’s no problem touring the country but what kind of infra structure is there for a smaller band to tour the country side? Is metal mainly a big city thing?
-Well, actually we don’t have sufficient means; it is about to looking for a developer or organization and ask for support on travel allowance to perform something. Currently Metal in Mexico is crewing up and with not so much support. We think that in Europe and Canada bands has more support because Metal is more known than here in Mexico. We think that there is not a good support for bands because there are not many organizers who are willing to invest in something like that.
Internally as a band we couldn’t afford a departure from the “country”, we would need support to do that. As a band we don’t have the infrastructure that we wanted including country level, promoters and organizers to support the bands also missing too for that and the bands coming out from Mexico to other places almost always have the support of outsiders and some intermediaries in the country, but nothing else, for that matter as there is no infrastructure that facilitates the bands get to play outside of Mexico.

How would you define black metal? What is black metal to you? Are there things you can’t do as band because it isn’t true black metal?
-We don’t like “true” term hahaha, but well, BLACK METAL is a feeling, is like a drug for us hahahaha, it is a way to express our internal demons as one of the most fascinating and dark genre of METAL. Paganism, darkness, freedom, desperation, self-destruction, hate, misanthropy just for mention some feelings that black metal is for us. Black Palace is characterized as an open minded band because we are open to other possibilities about sound, Black Metal is so important for us because we feel and enjoy each of our songs about this genre.

In Europe it seems like even in the remotest villages you can find great metal producers. How hard is it for you to find the right people to work with?
-We don’t know a lot of people who are producers or engineers, we think it is hard, currently we had a bad experience with the production of our album debut in fact we think that we have to looking for some safer production and that is hard because this kind of genre is crewing up.

What kind of future would you want Black Palace to have?
-Keep playing with BLACK PALACE to the end and go to other countries playing our music and we want nothing to stop its progress and keep the warpath! Thanks for taking a minute of your time and made this interview for us, thank you so much.

More about BLACK PALACE :
http://www.reverbnation.com/blackpalace
http://www.facebook.com/blackpalace666
http://www.myspace.com/blackpalace666

BLEEDING UTOPIA

I came upon Sweden’s BLEEDING UTOPIA by chance but they impressed me enough to wanting to know more about them and an interview was the obvious choice. Anders Ekdahl ©2012

With some distance between you and the studio session what feelings do you have for the album now?
A: Well I still think it´s a damn good album. We learned a lot in the recording process and I think the next album will go smoother to record, but we are proud of it and are already writing on our next album.

When you are in the studio how conscious are you of the finished result? Do you record the whole album and then go back and listen to it correcting small faults or do you work on just one track until it is done to perfection?
A: We first do pre-productions of the songs when we write them. And then we try to fix all the details and everything before we enter the studio. But there are always new ideas and stuff born in the studio to try, haha. But we often do instrument by instrument until we are satisfied. First we do the drums (to a guide guitar) until we are happy with the result and then guitars-bass-vocals etc etc. BUT we always have a vision how we want it to sound and how we will record it. But as I said there are always new ideas to try out in the studio but we always know how we want the finished product to sound. We don?t want to dig to much in it after its done?only a bit in the mixing process, because we still want the recording to sound as the feeling we had when we recorded it. It always what’s best right now for us.

How do you know that you are done in the studio and it is time to release the finished result on record?
A:That’s a difficult question. We have a guide line. Don´t overdo it. If you can´t do it live with the instrument you got in the band don´t do it on the record. We don´t want to have backing tracks and stuffs like that. We just want to plug in the guitar and rock and we want that everything we do on a recording we can do live. When we are happy and can´t stop head banging and none of the songs seems boring to listen to we think we are done, haha.

For those of us (me especially) that know very little about the band can you please give us a short introduction?
A:Ok, BLEEDING UTOPIA from Sweden. Playing a combo of 90´s Gothenburg death metal, Thrash metal and new Americano melodic death metal. The band was born in late 2009 by Andreas (guitar), Lawrence (Drums) and David (bass). They asked their old friends Henrik, from ex Skyfire, Mornaland, Favilla, to join in on vocals and Joakim to join in on guitar and the band was born.
We have over 60 years (together) in the metal scene and we know what we want and how we like to sound. Our influences are everything from old school death like Dismember, Entombed and Grave to more melodic metal as Dissection, Amon Amarth, At the gates and Black dahlia murder. Even extreme death as Nile and black metal are influences to us. I would like to think that we live by: A good song is a good song no matter what?

When you picked the band name did you just go for two words that sounded good together or was there a greater purpose to the band name?
A: oohh..I can’t really remember. I think we had a couple of band names up for suggestion and we had 2 that where our favorites, so I think we just took BLEEDING from one name and UTOPIA from the other name. We thought that is was a cool name for starters and the meaning that UTOPIA (the perfect world) are bleeding are so right. There is no perfect world out there the perfect world are born from within yourself, from your own ideas and your own imagination. Only you can bring yourself UTOPIA… and that other people are trying to step all over other people and destroying their dreams and telling them that they can’t do things. And until that stops the UTOPIA is BLEEDING.
Damn, that sounded so cheese but you know what I mean.

Is a utopian society sustainable? Aren’t we heading more for a dystopian world? There seem to be no end to the misery.
A: I don’t thing we ever can reach utopia. There are too many idiots out there, haha. But I don’t think a utopian world would work either you know there must be black if we want white, there must be an up if there shall be a down. It’s about doing the best of the situation… and never stop dreaming, never stop believing then maybe just maybe you can reach utopia within yourself.

How political do you consider the band to be? Is politics and music a good combination?
A: I don’t consider us to be a political band… but we have songs about war and brainwashed humans and religion so maybe a little bit political. I don’t know if it’s a good or bad combination. It depends. If you make people think it’s good.

Looking at your art work I get an abstract feeling. Is there something you’d like to say with the art work?
A: Well, there are always 2 sides of every story. There is always more than 1 path to choose. Either you hate us or you love us. It’s about the choices in life. We think it reflect the title ”Demons to some Gods to others” very well.

How do you know what will and will not work as art work when you decide on it? What kind of process do you go through when choosing art work?
A: We contact a guy or girl that we think do great stuff then we tell him or her about the title and what we mean with the title. Then they comes up with 1 or 2 or maybe 3 ideas and present them to us and we pick the one we like the most and they start to work with that one. The artist often get free hands when it comes to the artwork. So if they feel what we feel about the title its good. For this album Henrik at H.E.W design did a great job and captured the title very well.

Where do you see the band going and where would you like to see the band going?
A: I see the band going in the direction what we want right now. It’s going forward. We would like to tour the world with bands like Amon Amarth, Black Dahlia Murder, Behemoth and bands we really like. We would just like to have a blast out on the roads and make good albums, meat great people, eat strange food and drink strange booze and just have the time of our life, and if we make a buck or two that would be awesome to. We are a hard working band so we will do everything we can to get more fans and play more shows and bigger festivals and sell some albums and t-shirts, haha.

BLOODSHOT DAWN

BLOODSHOT DAWN is another British death metal band that proves all doubters wrong, There is still life in the underground. Anders Ekdahl ©2012

In my ears Bloodshot Dawn doesn’t sound British at all. Is the time when British metal lead the way over now?
-FOR ME BRITISH HEAVY METAL IS THE ORIGIN OF WHICH INFINATE SUB GENRES WERE CREATED, NOWADAYS WITHIN THE METAL COMMUNITY I DONT THINK THERE IS SUCH A COMPETITION OF WHICH COUNTRY HAS THE BEST AS THERE IS SO MUCH OUT THERE. NO ONE HAS THE RIGHT TO MAKE SUCH A STATEMENT. 50 YEARS AGO MAYBE..

Where do you guys draw most of your inspiration from?
-AS A BAND WE ALL HAVE DIFFERENT INFLUENCES AND SHARED INPUT INTO PUTTING THE SONGS TOGETHER. I WOULD SAY MELODIC DEATH METAL IS OUR PRODOMINANT INFLUENCE FROM BANDS SUCH AS SCAR SYMMETRY, IN FLAMES AND ARCH ENEMY. THE BAND CROSSOVER INTO MORE THRASH AND DEATH INFLUENCES FROM BANDS SUCH AS DECAPITATED,TESTAMENT AND DEW SCENTED. I GUESS IN A WAY WE DRAW INSPIRATION FROM MERGING ALL OUR INFLUENCES INTO ONE AND MAKING IT OUR OWN, TRYING TO PUSH THE SONGS TO THE BEST OF OUR ABILITY.

In releasing an album on your own what advantages do you expect to get from doing it this way?
-WE FELT THAT SELF RELEASE WAS THE BEST WAY TO RAISE OUR PROFILE INSTEAD OF WAITING FOR A LABEL TO PICK US UP. WE WANTED TO FUND THE RELEASE OURSELVES, PR WORK AND TOURING OFFOUR OWN BACK IN AN EFFORT TO SHOW THE INDUSTRY WE ARE WILLING TO GIVE EVERYTHING IN THIS CUT THROAT TIME. WE CONTINUE TO SEEK LABEL SUPPORT FOR FUTURE ENDEVEOURS THAT THE BAND PLAN TO TAKE!

How hard are you promoting the album? Any special tricks to get it out to as many as possible?
-WE HAVE TAKEN A FEW PATHS IN PROMOTING THE CD, NATURALLY WE HAVE USED GIGGING AND SOCIAL NETWORKING TO PROMOTE THE ALBUM. WE HAVE ALSO DECIDED TO RELEASE THE ALBUM FOR FREE WITH SUBSCRIBERS COPIES OF TERRORIZER MAGAZINE FOR THE APRIL ISSUE. WE WILL ALSO HAVE A TRACK ON THE COVERMOUNT CD FOR ALL OTHER COPIES! WE HAVE DONE THIS TO GET DIRECTLY TO THE FANS. THE ALBUM IS ALSO FREE TO STREAM IN FULL ON OUR BANDCAMP PAGE (http://www.bloodshotdawn.bandcamp.com) TO GIVE PEOPLE A TRY BEFORE YOU BUY! IF YOU LIKEIT YOU BUY IT… SIMPLE.

How hard is it to promote an album in this day and age when people seem to be more interested in songs than albums? When did this change, when did the album die out?
-IT IS OBVIOUSLY VERY DIFFICULT TO GET YOUR MUSIC OUT THERE NOWADAYS. I AM NOT SURE WHEN EXACTLY THE CD “DIED” BUT I DONT FEEL ITS SIGNIFICANCE IS COMPLETELY GONE. LIKE ALL WAYS OF LIFE WE AS MUSICIANS AND INDUSTRY FOLK MUST ADAPT TO THE NEW ENVIROMENT OF THE DOWNLOAD CULTURE AND ITS THE BANDS THAT WORK HARDEST WHICH WILL SURVIVE. SITES LIKE BANDCAMP REALLY HAVE THE RIGHT IDEA, LOOKING OUT FOR THE MUSICIANS INTEREST AT ALL TIMES, FOR INDEPENDANT ARTIST THIS IS THE FUTURE!

I must say that I’m pretty impressed by the whole album layout. It looks like a million quid. How do you go about getting something like that done?
-WELL WE SIMPLY LOOKED AT SOME ARTWORK WE FELT WAS TOP LEVEL OF SOME FAMILIAR BANDS AND CONTACTED THE CREATOR OF THE PIECES. PAR OLOFSON WAS OUR MAN AND THIS WAS HIS VISION OF A BLOODSHOT DAWN. OBVIOUSLY WE WERE DELIGHTED WITH HIS WORK SO WE LET HIM GO CRAZY AND HAD A FULL BOOKLETS WORTH OF UNIQUE ART CREATED! MY ADVICE IS TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME IN CHOOSING THE ARTIST WHO WILL BEST POTRAY YOUR IDEAS ONTO PAPER!

In being part of a new generation of British metal bands does it ever feel like the fate of the whole British metal scene lays on you succeeding?
THE BRITISH METAL SCENE IS NOT BASED ON THE BANDS WITHIN IT BUT THE FANS! WITHOUT THEM THERE WOULD BE NO BANDS! THERE ARE MANY HIDDEN GEMS ON OUR LITTLE ISLAND IF YOU JUST LOOK HARD ENOUGH!

Do you feel that you are part of any new British metal scene? What constitute a scene?
IN MY OPINION A SCENE IS A STATE OF MIND, WHY SHOULD ONE PERSONS TASTE AND STYLE DICTATE THEY CAN ONLY LIKE ONE KIND OF MUSIC GO TO ONLY THE SAME GENRE OF GIG EACH TIME? FOR ME THE UK GIG CIRCUIT IS VERY DIVERSE YOU CAN SEE DIFFERENT FACES EVERYTIME PLAY THE SAME PLACE BUT TO A DIFFERENT ROOM OF PEOPLE. WE ARE PART OF COLLECTIVE OF METAL BANDS, SCENE IS NOT A WORD I WOULD USE TO DESCRIBE THE MIX OF BANDS CURRENTLY RISING IN THE UK.

How much blood, sweat and tears are you prepared to shed for the band to succeed?
-THE BAND SPENT 18 MONTHS MOLDING THE CD TILL COMPLETION AND HAVE WORKED TIRELESSLY SELF PROMOTING TOURING AND MORE SINCE THEN, AND WE DONT INTEND TO STOP! FOR ME PERSONALLY THIS BAND IS MORE THAN MUSIC IT’S A LIFESTYLE AND AS STRESSFUL AND HARD AS IT IS I WOULD NOT CHANGE IT!

What are you doing to get the band onto the European summer festival circuit because it is there that I see you having the greatest potential reaching new fans.
-AS THE BAND HAVE NO LABEL BACKING OUR ONLY HOPE FOR NOW IS TO APPLY FOR THE FESTIVALS THE GOOD OLD FASION WAY WITH A PRESS PACK AND ALBUM! WE HOPE TO GET OUT TO EUROPE BY THE END OF 2012, WE ARE PRIMED AND READY TO MELT SOME EURO FACE!

Links:
http://www.bloodshotdawn.bandcamp.com
http://www.facebook.com/bloodshotdawn
http://www.bloodshotdawn.bigcartel.com
http://www.youtube.com/bloodshotdawnuk
http://www.myspace.com/bloodshotdawn

DEATHRAISER

DEATHRAISER is to my ears what the second wave of thrash metal was all about in the late 80s/early 90s. Anders Ekdahl ©2012

Does being Brazilian and playing the kind of thrash that Sepultura, Sarcofago Sextrash etc. did in the 80s help opening up people’s eyes to your music?
William: We believe it has a good point, because they were great bands of our scene, but already today are not like before, and the public misses this season, but of course we have to play the way we like, these bands have the same sounding our identity, something they also had the same sounding slayer season haha, it is clear that good influences can add the band and try to absorb what is good about these bands, if the public likes them, will certainly like to hear something influenced by them.

When you come from a country and a continent that has given the world so much great thrash does that add to the pressure of being good?
William: I think not, because if it were the bands of the Usa or Germany would be fucked up haha, but I think that pressure does not happen, we make our sound regardless of the media like it or not, do nothing forced, and we are totally against it. But we understand that to get some good sound also has to be good.

When you play music that isn’t the latest trend and you lose a member how hard is it to find a like-minded to fill that gap?
William: It is always difficult to find musicians wanting to do this kind of music, especially here in the interior where it is not very popular, but we trying to give the way, being in trio or quartet sound cannot stop haha

I guess everything is a trial and error trip being in a band but is there something that you with the answer in hand would have wanted to have done differently?
William: Just would do differently if we had money haha. But we like to produce like that, you have to break down walls, sometimes difficult but it has moments that takes the band to want something, it was all too easy would not have the same grace.

What is the label situation like for thrash/death metal bands in Brazil? Are there any labels worth signing with that can bring your music to the World?
William: Today we have many labels serious here in Brazil that really help the bands, but also have those who do nothing. I believe it is everywhere and it would be different here in Brazil. But working with a good Label but we have great chances to achieve larger goals.

When you see bands like Krisiun getting signed and touring the World does that increase the motivation in you to work your hardest to get that too?
William: We always had the motivation, of course it is great to do great tours, playing in several places, but I believe this is the result of a good job, these bands worked hard to get have earned to date, and we see no other way unless so work hard, always make the right choices with a passion for doing things will always work.

Do you feel that you are a part of a new thrash metal wave going round the world?
William: We feel that we are more a Thrash Metal band looking to play with passion and style that will not only be more of a new wave, this is not our desire, this whole “new wave” shows that most bands are just “waves “that appear and disappear, so if you’re not in” new wave “, many bands that have emerged and appear in this” revival “of thrash just does not hold in the scene, following trends or anything like that, thrash metal is the even though “Old” or “new wave” and always will be played and heard, so for us is Thrash or Die hahaha.

Is the thrash metal scene one big united one or do you feel competition and envy from other bands?
William: Here in Brazil at least some thrash bands do not see this competition, where we do festivals with bands of our friends and we see much unity, at least in this environment, there may be competition yes, but not from us, we like and why not to create divergences in something we believe in and raise the flag, we see that saying “Cooperation, not Competition”!

What ways are there to promote your music in Brazil? Is the paper fanzine still big in Brazil or is it all digital there too?
William: Promoted in various ways, and most of them surely is the internet, but there are still printed zines, magazines and other digital forms, whichever is best to publicize we certainly all means are welcome, but is Printing clear that here zines fell dramatically due to the increase of the Internet.

What can we expect from Deathraiser in 2012?
William: We have several plans in mind, if all goes well we will do our first clip, we are also planning a South American tour later this year, and of course make something new, for 2013 we have a new full length, thanks to all who enjoy and support the Deathraiser hopefully see you soon on stage! Keeping The Spirit underground!

DOROTA

DOROTA follow in the fine tradition of strong women fronting their own band, pretty much like Doro or Betsy bitch. Anders Ekdahl ©2012

I don’t have too many heavy metal/hardrock solo artists in my collection. What made you decided to go about using you own name and not a band name instead?
– To be honest, such was not my intention. At that time it was not easy to find a band, the right guys, and of course I never wanted to give up making music, so I decided to
go on by myself. I started to learn how to use programs like cubase and had luck to get in touch with people like Karen Stever and Frank Gryner (Rob Zombie producer). That opened doors for me into the music business.

What kind of background do you have as a metal musician? Where do you come from and what turned you on to metal in the first place?
– I think my first influence making that kind of music was my brother, when he got his first guitar “laugh”. He’s always been listening to music like slayer, nirvana, garbage etc,
I really loved that style of heavy guitars. That was the moment where i never wanted to stop making music *haha*. I originally come from Poland but live in Austria since my early childhood. So I don’t think that my love to metal has something to do with it, where i come from.

When you front a band how hard is it to find the right kind of people to work with? What do you expect from the people you work with?
– It’s extremly hard to find the right guys. i never thought that it would be such a problem to find people with the same goals, the same taste of music etc. So it’s a great PLUS if you already have a band that works. So that are points that I also expect from people that I work with. FUN, SAME TASTE and SAME GOAL.

How involved are you in the creative process? How involved do you allow the other musicians to be in the creative process?
– I’m pretty much involved. i create nearly everything by myself (lyrics, music, photoshop-art etc.). In my opinion it’s so important for an artist to show your creativity and not acting around. That’s why i’m against all the casting shows. If the others have creative ideas, they are always welcome.

When you write music and lyrics how much work is there in not repeating something that has already been done? How hard is it to come up with something that is somewhat original?
– That’s always diffrent. Sometimes it takes long, so I have to take a break for a moment. And sometimes it feels like your hand would write by itself, really fast. The easiest way to write lyrics was, when you had a situation that really touched you. That’s the way i work and the reason why my stories never repeat. (laugh).

How satisfying is it to see a final product, something that you’ve slaved over for months finally being ready? What kind of feelings do you have right now?
– Oh that a feeling that you can’t describe. You feel like tons of weight would fall of your shoulders. Like sex, Christmas, birthday and Easter together.

What kind of pressure does it bring to you being the front figure, the one that gets blamed if everything turns out pear shaped?
– Oh, I love it and I never could imagine anything else. And if you have fear of getting blamed, than you have the wrong job. You should change your profession.

How do you as front figure avoid being totally exploited? What kind of saying do you have in the way you are portrayed?
– You have to be a strong personallity not a yes-person. You just have to have clear limitations in that business.

What does having a record label for support that is relatively close by and speak the same language?
-My record label right now is really great. They support all my imaginations. Me and my lable really speak the same language and have the same goals.

What goodies does 2012 hold for you?
-Right now I’m really excited to bring out my album physically on March 23rd. We are also busy with my first video. That will be a little splatter-clip. Everything else will be a surprise

FUNERAL WHORE

Dutch FUNERAL WHORE are old school death metal the way death metal used to be when I gbrew up. With equal doses Swedish and Floridian death metal they blast us through the night. Anders Ekdahl © 2012

How important is the right band name as a statement of intent? How controversial is the band name in actuality?
Roy: Nothing special. The name just sounds brutal, that’s all.

You seem pretty obsessed with old school Swedish death metal, or so it seems. What is it that is so great about this stuff?
Roy: Osdm just sounds so brutal, caused by its simplicity and easy listening. The predictable elements are exacly one of the coolest thing in this genre. No technical fucking constant peaking shitmetal but easy built up straight ahead and in your face.

What is wrong with modern day death metal? When/where did it go wrong?
Roy: Unlike Tim, I hate technical shit like Necrophagist, Obscura, Nile, shit like that. With the incoming of emo, screamo or deathcore shit, it went completly wrong. This corestuff has NOTHING to do with metal at all. But also media like Aardschok contributed in the demise. These fuckers support every genre, loads of fake metal, giving people the impression that the metalscene is some sort of universal playground for everybody.
Tim: I personally like the modern day death metal. Technical bands are really great for the death metal scene. It’s the metalcore bands that are fucking ridiculous, which has nothing to do with death metal anymore.

How do you go about getting the right sound both on stage and in studio so that you don´t end up sounding like the latest metalcore acts?
Roy: First of all, we write osdm in its most known way, so we simply can’t sound like a metalcore. Me and Kellie play both on BC Rich, both on same amplifiers and both using the same guitarsettings. Tim has also his own amplifier settings. This works quick in build up on stage, soundcheck and in the rehearsal room.

When you play death metal I guess that everything from promo pics to album covers to backdrops for the stage has to be the right way. How do you go about getting everybody to go along on getting everything perfectly correct?
Roy: All members are very open minded, loyal, close related, but above all, very enthousiastic and extremely fanatic. When these key elements are in a band, than its obvious good results will eventually come up.
Tim: Luckely we, pretty much, all have the same taste, so it isn´t hard to get merchandise the way we like it. As long, as it is morbid and brutal.

What kind of death metal scene do we speak of in Beverwijk? Any cool squats to play?
Roy: Well, none. But this is not much different than in the rest of our country. But here in the north it’s very poor. When you have past Haarlem region, you’ve past the “metalscene”.
The best gigs are, most of the time, our own package gigs with other osdm bands from Holland or foreign countries.
Tim: Here in the north of Holland is not much to say about death metal. It is not big at all. There are some venues in the area around, but mostly in the neighbourhood are bars. No underground metal bars. Just random ass cafe´s.

The Netherlands has always been a great place for metal. What is it that makes Holland so good for metal?
Roy: With the coming of the euro and internet media, the scene made a tremendous metamorphose. For media bussinessmen and posers great, for underground people a sad defeat. This place isn’t the best but we also do not complain too much because we get most of the time our things done.
Tim: Problably because the scene isn´t al that big. You really can, and have, to be fanatic about your music.

You are a Dutch death metal band on a Mexican label. Has the world of metal become less distant with modern technology so that it doesn’t matter if your label is on a different continent?
Roy: One of the good things with this technology. Indeed, now, it really doesn’t matter if your label is on the westbank, Africa or Alaska. One email adres is needed and things can be done. Great!
Tim: It isn´t all because of modern technology, ofcourse it helps to get things done faster. But there are still people that do things the old way. It takes a bit longer but who cares, something to look forward to in the post-box.

How do you utilize the social media best to gain maximum exposure? Any dangers in using the social media in spreading the word of the band?
Roy: No I don’t think so. And If so, I don’t care about rumors, lies or social media in general at all.

Will 2012 be the year that everybody gets to hear about Funeral Whore? What plans do you have?
Roy: Absolutly! Full length has been received great, we have a lot of gigs to play, material to trade and new osdm bands and fans to meet.

UNDERGANG

Danish dynamite is not only found in liquid form. UNDERGANG proves that the Danish death metal scene is not dead and buried. Anders Ekdahl ©2012

Being a Swede from Skåne I have no problem understanding Danish but I?m in the minority of folks outside of Denmark understanding Danish. Why have you chosen to use Danish as the chosen language?
– The decision to keep all the lyrics in Danish was made after we chose a Danish word for the name of our band. From that choice it seemed only natural to keep everything in a our native tongue. Besides that, in all honesty, when we started out the band we never had any idea that as many people would give us the recognition as we have now gained. We just set out to play what we consider real Death Metal and never expected more than some appreciation from the people around us here in Copenhagen. But fun to hear from someone who actually understand our lyrics outside of Denmark, we don’t get a lot of attention from other Scandinavian people in general actually.

I get an old school Bolt Thrower/Carcass feel when I see the artwork and hear the music. What is it that influences you?
– Sounds sick man, not too bad of a start, haha. CARCASS is definitely a band that has inspired us in several ways when it comes to writing music for UNDERGANG. Besides that I’d name bands like AUTOPSY, WINTER, PUNGENT STENCH, CREMATORY (sweden!), IMPETIGO, MORTICIAN and tons of other disgusting older bands. As for atmosphere we also get influenced by tons of horror movies and personally some music of GOBLIN as well. Artwork wise I’m a big fan of 70’s and 80’s horror comics and as I’m responsible for almost all of the artwork used for UNDERGANG it has taken its place in our visuals.

Danish metal has always been of the highest quality but for most of the time lived a life far away from the limelight of the international metal scene. What is your opinion on why we see so few Danish bands really making it like fx the Swedish ones have done?
– Well, maybe because most of the Danish bands since MERCYFUL FATE has sucked! I’m definitely not a fan of Danish metal in general as there’s always something “Danish” sounding to them. Something I really don’t like. A lot of the bands tend to over polish everything during studio sessions and live they’re just basic goofballs. I might be over saturating a slight bit, but this is just my 5 cents. We do however have some cool newer bands like CEREKLOTH, PUSTULATION, STRYCHNOS, MOLD, BONE, CHURCH BIZARRE, DEUS OTIOSUS etc.

What is the current diagnosis of the Danish metal scene? Any really good bands that might make it all the way?
– It depends on how you look at it, I guess. I mentioned some bands above that I think delivers deadly metal these days, but if you talk about making it big, I really don’t know. Probably some boring shit like DAWN OF DEMISE (Dawn of the mice, hehe), even though they suck. At least down here, the Danish bands that gets the attention of most of the crowd are gay, modern-sounding, plastic, core shit. We besides the more “mainstream” sounding bands we do have another sub-scene where we try to present the more honest, or “real”, metal band around. I’m a part of the group organizing the annual Kill-Town Death Fest, a DIY underground death metal festival held in Copenhagen’s North West quarter. We offer some of the sickest death metal bands around these days to the public, with the strongest focus on the Scandinavian death metal scene. in 2012 we arrange the 3rd edition of this celebration of the current underground death metal scene, the bands and all the people involved. Check out our website www.killtowndeathfest.dk for more info!

I remember from the 80s/90s that there was a pretty strong DIY-ethics in the Danish youth culture. What is the status of that whole scene today? Is the DIY-ethic still as strong today?
– Oh yeah, I definitely think so. Gain, it depends on where you look, but I think that in the underground movement of the scene there’s definitely more of a DIY feel to it than on the surface. F.ex. the Kill-Town Death Fest I just mentioned is completely DIY and run by volunteers. We have around 100 volunteers working their asses of a day, when we do the festival. Also in general when it comes to shows there absolutely still the DIY ethics behind a lot of them. But again, depends on where you look.

How much of a difference is there between Copenhagen and places like Helsingör or Odense or Roskilde in terms of public responses and places to play and the local scenes in general?
– Copenhagen is the place to be when it comes to getting chances to play more shows in Denmark, I’d say. We have a lot of clubs and venues that take in most bands looking for shows. I grew up in a small town a little more than 10 km away from Helsingør, called Espergærde, and up there we pretty much only had one place where we went to shows. It still exist too, but it’s not really a place lots of bands visit or probably even know of. I honestly don’t know much about Odense, but I see that they currently have some upcoming Brutal Death Metal shows there. Not really anything for me, so I don’t pay that much attention to it. In Jylland there’s several places for shows, mainly in the bigger cities as Aarhus, Fredericia, Aalborg and such. The scene is slightly different though and some of the people how different opinions of things than people here on “Djævle-Øen”. I guess there’ still kind of a “fight” between the two places, with people from Copenhagen thinking that the others are nothing but a bunch of hicks and the people from Jylland thinking that all people Copenhagen are “pseudo”-swedes and what not. No offense man, you probably know the drill and have some of the same things going on in Sweden. UNDERGANG haven’t played many places inside Denmark. Tons of times in Copenhagen and then we’ve visited Roskilde, Aalborg, Fredericia and Svendborg.

How are you going to take Undergang out of Denmark and unto the international meal scene?
– By touring of course! We’ve already done a West Coast tour in the US with 17 dates and we just returned from a 16 date European tour with FUNEBRARUM. We’ve played varied places in Europe already and are working on some shows around New York with our friends in FUNEBRARUM and DISMA right now, besides another US tour, this time on the East Coast. Besides that our music gets published by Xtreem Music (Spain), Me Saco Un Ojo records (U.K.), Dark Descent records (U.S.) and we’ve been featured on a compilation released by Baphometal records (Argentina). So the language barrier isn’t such a big deal as you might think!

With a couple of albums to your name this is starting to get serious. How do you maximize the output in order to take it as far as possible?
– We just do whatever we feel like, actually. Luckily we know quite a few people from net-working for years and we get a lot of support from our labels when it comes to promotion to. We don’t have any wish to be the next METALLICA, we just do things in order of what feels right for us and then do it. We get a good amount of offers to release our music, we have labels run by people we know and like as persons as well and the same goes when it comes to getting shows or getting help with having a tour booked. We’re a very lucky band indeed dude!

When you are a small band how important is playing live? Can you make a name for yourself just by touring?
– I think it’s very important to play a good amount of shows a year, especially as a rather young band! Of course you shouldn’t play ALL the fucking time in your hometown (though we did it for starters, which I think have only been a good thing), but enough for people to know who you are and what your all about. Besides that, playing live give you way more experience as a musician than just playing in your rehearsal place. Touring is also a good way to get your name out there even further, but I think the best recognition you’ll get is by net-working and with the help a good label can provide you with.

Do you see a future for Undergang and what will it hold?
– More records, more touring, more boozing, smoking more weed and totally kicking ass! We’re just going to continue what we’ve already created and enjoy every single bit of it. You never know if you might get run over by a car tomorrow, do all you can do when you have the possibility to do so or weep later! Thanks for the interest in our band for the interview. Hopefully we’ll play somewhere nearby in Sweden some day!

ABSOLACE “Fractals”

ABSOLACE
“Fractals”
(-)
I got a soft spot for Soundgarden and Temple Of The Dogs. So sue me for thinking that Absolace are simply brilliant. That they come from a place that isn’t the most open just makes this so much of an experience. The United Arab Emirate might not be the most common place to find hard music coming from but Absolace prove that with great determination you can survive even in the most hostile environments. Musically this could be described as a light version of Tool or perhaps a continuation of A Perfect Circle. It is in that region this album moves. It paints with broad strokes. Gently sweeping through the subtle to the chaotic in one move. Making this a journey that takes you up high as well as down deep. Never losing sight of the end result. Never letting you down as a listener. Anders Ekdahl

AIRSPEED “Airspeed”

AIRSPEED
“Airspeed”
(Jolly Roger Records)
Just the band name Airspeed alone signals that this could be a ride to remember. This is heavy metal in the classic tradition. High wailing vocals, melodies aplenty and guitar solos. What more can you want? OK, so the production could have been a bit warmer but the rather rudimentary sound actually adds to the charm of this. This is a new band to me and I don’t know too much about them even though they seem awfully familiar to me but that doesn’t stop me from liking this album. Like I said, there is a charm to this that makes it hard not to like it. It’s almost an innocent approach, like if the band had started in the early 80s and just learnt how things work. Well worth checking out never the less if you like traditional heavy metal with a very 80s feel. Anders Ekdahl

ALTAR OF SIN “Tales Of Carnage First Class”

ALTAR OF SIN
“Tales Of Carnage First Class”
(Xtreem Music)
Spain might not be the first place you think of if you like extreme metal but once you dig a bit deeper you’ll find a treasure that isn’t that hidden. Xtreem Music has for some time brought the world a bucketful of bands that in various degrees bring forth Spain as a metal country to count on. Altar Of Sin are thrash metal on the extreme end of the scale. This is thrash metal the way Kreator or Destruction were thrash metal in the 80s (no other comparisons done). This is full on blasting metal that takes no prisoners. It just leaves victims; decimated, decapitated and left for dead victims. This is carnage put to music. And it is pretty darn good too, if you like your thrash to beat you to a pulp. This is “work-out for the neck” music. Anders Ekdahl